Items filtered by date: June 2022

Tuesday, 21 June 2022 00:00

Dealing With Plantar Warts

If you notice a flat hardened callus on the bottom of your foot with tiny black spots showing beneath the skin, you may have a plantar wart. The area might be tender, but try not to touch it. This growth may be caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), which is highly contagious and can enter your body through cuts or sores. The most common places to come into contact with HPV are swimming pools, locker rooms, and bathroom floors, all areas in which you are more likely to walk barefooted. Generally speaking, plantar warts are not dangerous, but they do spread rapidly. The most effective preventative method is to wear foot coverings in places where the virus thrives. If plantar warts become a common occurrence, refuse to go away on their own, or inhibit your ability to walk, it is a good idea to visit a podiatrist for guidance and a range of treatment options.


 

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact the foot specialists from Table Mountain Foot and Ankle. Our doctors will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Wheat Ridge, CO . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 14 June 2022 00:00

Different Forms of Heel Pain

Heel pain can be caused by a variety of factors, including biomechanical issues, injuries, arthritis, and more. By far, the most common form of heel pain is plantar fasciitis, a painful inflammation of the plantar fascia tissue on the bottom of the foot that connects the heel bone with the toes. Heel spurs, which often occur concurrently with plantar fasciitis, are actually bone growths that build up on the heel bone where the plantar fascia attaches to it as a result of long-term stress. Sever’s disease occurs in growing children. It is an inflammation in the growth plate of their heel that occurs from repetitive stress to the area from physical activity or overuse. Haglund’s deformity, also known as a pump bump, occurs when the bony section at the back of the heel rubs against shoes and causes the soft tissue to become irritated and form a bump where the heel attaches to the Achilles tendon. Nerve compression can also cause heel pain, numbness, and tingling. It is sometimes associated with an ankle sprain and is known as heel neuritis. There is a fluid-filled bursa sac at the back of the heel which can become irritated and swollen from improperly fitted footwear. This condition is known as bursitis. A podiatrist can diagnose your particular heel pain after reviewing your medical history, examining you, and running diagnostic tests. Call a podiatrist today to begin to get relief from your heel pain today.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact the foot specialists of Table Mountain Foot and Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Wheat Ridge, CO . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 07 June 2022 00:00

Ankle Sprains Are a Common Ankle Injury

The ankle is a complex joint composed of several bones, ligaments, tendons, nerves, and muscles. Because it is critical in moving the foot in a variety of ways, the ankle is prone to becoming injured. One of the most common types of ankle injuries is an ankle sprain. This occurs when one or more ligaments that support and bind the ankle are stretched beyond their normal bounds and become injured or torn (either partially or fully). The pain and complexities of an ankle sprain can vary, depending upon how severe it has become injured and whether the ligament has torn. It is important to seek treatment from a podiatrist for any type of ankle sprain, as an improperly healed ankle sprain is likely to lead to additional sprains and possibly even chronic ankle instability. 

Although ankle sprains are common, they aren’t always minor injuries. If you need your ankle injury looked at, contact the foot specialists from Table Mountain Foot and Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains are the result of a tear in the ligaments within the ankle. These injuries may happen when you make a rapid shifting movement while your foot is planted. A less common way to sprain your ankle is when your ankle rolls inward while your foot turns outward.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Pain at the sight of the tear
  • Bruising/Swelling
  • Ankle area is tender to touch
  • In severe cases, may hear/feel something tear
  • Skin discoloration

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

In many cases, the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevate) is used to treat ankle sprains. However, you should see a podiatrist to see which treatment option would work best with your injury. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

It is important to ask your doctor about rehab options after you receive treatment for your injury. Stretching, strength training, and balance exercises may help the ankle heal while also preventing further injury.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Wheat Ridge, CO . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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