Tuesday, 18 January 2022 00:00

There are many causes of heel pain, including bursitis. The retrocalcaneal bursa is a fluid-filled sac located between the heel bone and the Achilles tendon. It cushions and lubricates the tendon as it slides over the heel bone, while acting as a shock absorber during walking and other movements. Excessive walking, running, jumping or other stress inducing activities placed upon the ankle may cause this bursa to become swollen, irritated, and inflamed. The skin at the back of the heel may be warm or red. The affected area may also become very sensitive to the touch, and painful during physical activity or when standing on your toes. If you feel this type of pain at the back of your heel that does not improve with rest, it is in your best interest to schedule an appointment with a podiatrist. They will perform a physical examination and may recommend certain conservative treatments such as icing, anti-inflammatory medication, orthotics or heel wedges to reduce stress on the heel, ultrasound and/or physical therapy, or possibly even steroid injections if other methods do not work.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact the foot specialists of Table Mountain Foot and Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Wheat Ridge, CO . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 11 January 2022 00:00

Athlete’s foot is a fungal infection of the skin on the feet. While it usually causes itching, burning, stinging, and peeling skin, sometimes a person can have athlete’s foot with no symptoms at all. In those cases, the person will likely be unaware that they have an infection. Some people may have only very mild symptoms, and mistake athlete’s foot for dry skin on the soles of their feet. Athlete’s foot can be very contagious, capable of spreading from person to person and from one part of the body to another. If you suspect that you may have athlete’s foot, it is strongly suggested that you see a podiatrist for proper treatment. 

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact the foot specialists from Table Mountain Foot and Ankle.  Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Wheat Ridge, CO . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 04 January 2022 00:00

Broken toes often result from trauma. They may occur from dropping something directly on the toes, stubbing a toe, or bending them the wrong way. Toes can also break due to a stress fracture after a sudden increase in activity. The common indications of a broken toe include a snapping or popping sound at the time of the injury, swelling, bruising, and pain that becomes worse when the toe is moved. Patients who notice these symptoms may have a broken toe and would be wise to see a podiatrist who can assess the injury. A podiatrist will need to take an x-ray, and if a broken toe is confirmed, they can determine the best course for treatment. Depending on the nature of the break, the toe can be “buddy-taped” to the uninjured toe next to it, placed in a cast, or in severe cases surgery may be required.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact the foot specialists from Table Mountain Foot and Ankle. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Wheat Ridge, CO . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe
Saturday, 01 January 2022 00:00

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

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